What Jupiter can tell us about the formation of the universe

On December 7, 1995, a crowd gathered in an auditorium at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in Pasadena, California, waiting for an event that had been years in the making. At 8:04 pm PST, a stout, 4-foot (1.25 meter)-wide, wok-shaped robotic probe, which had been released from the unmanned Galileo spacecraft five months… » 11/07/13 4:13pm 11/07/13 4:13pm

Re-Creating An Action Sequence From 365 Million Miles Away

One of the scenes in the new Space Show, Dark Universe takes viewers along for a 106,000 mile-an-hour descent into Jupiter’s atmosphere with the Galileo probe—an action-packed visualization created by scientists and artists working closely to make sure that every detail, from the probe’s rotation speed to the color of… » 11/04/13 1:49pm 11/04/13 1:49pm

How to defend Earth from incoming asteroids

There are about a million near-Earth asteroids that are large enough to damage or destroy a major city, as evidenced by the explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia, this past February of a meteor that injured more than 1,000 people. This month, Ukrainian astronomers detected a 1,350-foot-wide asteroid that made a close… » 10/18/13 5:06pm 10/18/13 5:06pm

Retro fan art from the original Hayden Planetarium

When the Hayden Planetarium first opened in October 1935 at the American Museum of Natural History, it was only the fourth planetarium in the United States. Inside the 75-foot dome, many New Yorkers saw, for the first time, all of the stars visible to the unaided eye, as well as the Sun, Moon, planets, and our spiral… » 10/11/13 10:58am 10/11/13 10:58am